Wild Northern Caribou Reindeer

Wild Northern Caribou Reindeer

Wild Northern Caribou Reindeer

SPECIAL NOTE: Wild Northern Caribou Reindeer Currently Not Available

(Reindeer is sometimes substituted for Caribou.) What is the difference between Reindeer and Caribou? See our Hills Foods Blog under Caribou/Reindeer for full explanation.

The cost associated with harvesting wild northern caribou from the Canadian north is quite prohibitive. Putting on a CFIA federal inspected harvest is very, very expensive. There has not been a harvest of any quantity of note for several years. There has not been any indication as of late that would cause us to speculate that there might be a harvest in the near future. Too bad for now. Its one of the finest game meats on the planet. Having said that, on our last trip to the arctic we brought along some wild harvest kangaroo to allow the local Inuit people to try. They said it was delicious and could be a great alternative to caribou and muskox if they could get it.

The harvesting of Caribou has played a major role in the Inuit culture for several thousand years providing a staple for clothing, food and shelter. The herds of Canada’s North are significantly larger now than in decades past and their numbers are closely monitored to ensure the sustainability of the species.

Select Cuts

Tenderloins, Striploins, Racks Frenched (9 bone), Escalopes (two to three oz./piece), Denver Legs, Hind Leg – Bone In, Shoulder Boneless (netted chuck), Stew Meat/Ground/Trimmed/Boneless, Sausage with Juniper and Red Wine, Kebabs, Jerky (regular/terikyaki), Burgers.

Prep Tips

Overcooking is to be avoided and fast searing over high heat works well for smaller cuts. For larger cuts, low and slow are the best rules of thumb due to the low fat content of caribou. Its intensely flavourful nature makes it the perfect protein to pair with strong flavoured vegetables such as red cabbage, turnips or beets and provides a perfect resting place for wine reductions and fruit sauces.